Saturday, April 7, 2012

Haul + Comparisons: Chanel New Brushes 2012 (Matte Handle)

#1 Powder Brush ~ #4 Blush Brush ~ #19 Blending Brush ~ #26 Small Contour/Shadow Brush ~ #14 Contour/Shadow Brush

#1 Powder Brush ~ #4 Blush Brush ~ #19 Blending Brush ~ #26 Small Contour/Shadow Brush ~ #14 Contour/Shadow Brush

#1 Powder Brush ~ #4 Blush Brush ~ #19 Blending Brush ~ #26 Small Contour/Shadow Brush ~ #14 Contour/Shadow Brush

I never bought any of Chanel's brushes because I wasn't a huge fan of the brass ferrule and shiny handle. They recently revamped their entire brush line and released over a dozen new brushes that have a nickel ferrule and a matte handle, which looks more classy and professional. Therefore, I had to get 5 in one shopping session. =) I also placed an order for their #15 eyeshadow brush on their main website, but it's currently on backorder. (It's only available on Chanel.com and at Chanel Makeup Studios.) Hopefully, it'll be back in stock soon so I can review it for you all. =)


Packaging: All of the brushes come with a box and a velvet pouch, which I find to be cute, but not practical. It's just much easier to store my brushes in a brush holder and if I'm travelling, I prefer to use a brush case because I don't want to dirty the pretty pouches. (I am OCD and a neat freak.)

The back of the box indicates the country in which the brushes were manufactured. The #1 powder brush, #4 blush brush and #26 small contour/shadow brush are made in China, while the #14 contour/shadow brush and #19 blending brush are made in France. The country of origin does not affect my buying decision. I've had both good and bad experiences with brushes that are manufactured in China as well as in France.




MAC Gareth Pugh 182 Brush $60 (full review) - The bristles feel softer and are more densely packed compared to the Chanel #1 brush. However, the Chanel #1 brush is by no means scratchy or uncomfortable on the skin. Both brushes are great for buffing out over-applied products and for applying setting powder, but the Chanel brush is a more suitable option if you want lighter coverage since the bristles are less dense. I also prefer the Chanel brush for applying my Too Faced Chocolate Soleil bronzer because it picks up the right amount of product and disperses evenly onto my skin. I thought that the brush head was going to be too big for my cheek area; however, it's actually not because the tip of the brush is curved. So, when I tap the brush into the pan, the product only transfers onto the tip of the brush. Therefore, when I place the brush onto my skin, the product does not cover a huge portion of my face. Instead, the product applies perfectly onto my cheek area.

MAC 109 Brush $34 (mini review) - The MAC 109 and Chanel #1 brush are two totally different brushes because they serve different purposes. Neither of the two are better than the other. The MAC 109 brush is pictured mainly for size comparison.

Chanel #1 Powder Brush $65 - The quality of this brush is great because the natural bristles feel soft and it only shedded one hair during its initial wash. I didn't experience any dye bleeding or funky smell. As for performance, it is ideal for applying setting powder & bronzer as well as buffing out over-applied products. It never leaves a heavy or cakey finish because the bristles are not too dense, but it also blends products like a dream because the bristles are not too flimsy. The #1 brush just has the right amount of density to perform both tasks effortlessly. (It measures 7.25 inches in total length.)




Studio Gear #13 Blush Brush $35 (full review) - The bristles feel softer than the Chanel #4 brush; however, it is by no means scratchy or uncomfortable on the skin. The Studio Gear #13 brush is also wider and has a more oval tip, while the Chanel #4 brush has a more pointed, tapered tip. Regardless, they both fit on my cheek area perfectly and apply blushes very well. Also, they are both dense enough for blending.

Chanel #4 Blush Brush $54 - The quality is just as great as the Chanel #1 Powder brush and I have not experienced any shedding, even after multiple washes and uses. The #4 brush is ideal for blush application, but it can also be used for highlighting the cheekbones and even contouring because it has a slightly pointed, tapered tip. (It measures 6.25 inches in total length and the bristles are made from natural hair.)

Sonia Kashuk Large Crease Brush ~ Chanel #19 Blending Brush ~ Japonesque Crease Brush

Sonia Kashuk Large Crease Brush ~ Chanel #19 Blending Brush ~ Japonesque Crease Brush

Sonia Kashuk Large Crease Brush ~ Chanel #19 Blending Brush ~ Japonesque Crease Brush

Sonia Kashuk Large Crease Brush $5.99 (mini review) - It's denser, firmer, and wider than the Chanel #19 brush. The Sonia Kashuk brush is my holy grail blending brush and nothing will ever replace it because it blends out harsh lines and dark pigmented eyeshadows, effortlessly. It isn't as soft as the Chanel #19, but I find that the Sonia Kashuk brush works well for blending because of the fact that it's not too soft. Some people have commented that it feels scratchy; however, I have 7 of these and none of them feel scratchy or uncomfortable on my sensitive eyes.

Japonesque Professional Crease Brush $18 (full review) - The head of the brush is smaller and shorter than the Chanel #19. However, both brushes have the same density and almost the same width at the tip; therefore, I find that they both essentially perform the same. Both brushes are great for crease work, defining the outer v, blending product on the lower lash line, and adding color to the outer corner of the eye & a highlight color to the inner tear duct. 

Chanel #19 Large Tapered Blending Brush $38 - The quality is just as great as the other 2 Chanel brushes that I have mentioned above. The bristles are made from natural hair and feel very soft. This brush is a multi-tasker. It fits perfectly on my crease, defines my outer v, and places color where I need it to. Although it does not blend as well as my Sonia Kashuk brush, I find that the Chanel #19 is good enough for blending light colors and it will blend harsh lines if you put more time and effort into it. (It measures 6.25 inches in total length.)

MAC 239 Brush ~ Chanel #26 Small Contour/Shadow Brush ~ Japonesque Small Professional Eye Detailer Brush ~ Chanel #14 Contour/Shadow Brush

MAC 239 Brush ~ Chanel #26 Small Contour/Shadow Brush ~ Japonesque Small Professional Eye Detailer Brush ~ Chanel #14 Contour/Shadow Brush

MAC 239 Brush ~ Chanel #26 Small Contour/Shadow Brush ~ Japonesque Small Professional Eye Detailer Brush ~ Chanel #14 Contour/Shadow Brush

MAC 239 Brush $24.50 (full review) - It packs color onto the lids and lower lash line very well because the bristles are firm, thin and soft. Both the Chanel #26 and #14 brush are thinner, smaller and offer more precision, but they are too small for applying color onto my lids and they both feel slightly scratchy on my lower lash line.

Japonesque Small Professional Eye Detailer Brush $13.50 (mini review) - It is not as wide as the Chanel #26 brush, but it is wider than the Chanel #14 brush. It also feels softer, is slightly firmer, and most importantly, it does not irritate my lower lash line. Therefore, I prefer using the Japonesque brush for adding color to my lower lash line, setting my eyeliner with eyeshadow, and for any other detail work.

Chanel #26 Small Contour/Shadow Brush $30 + Chanel #14 Contour/Shadow Brush $28 - Both are firm & thin and are ideal for detail work. They both essentially perform the same, but the #14 offers slightly more precision because it's smaller. However, when I use either of the brushes on my lower lash line, it feels uncomfortable. I'm assuming that I just have a sensitive eye area because when I rub my fingers through the bristles, they feel soft and not scratchy at all. (The #26 brush measures 5.75 inches in total length and the #14 brush measures 5.90 inches.)

Bottom Line: I highly recommend checking out Chanel's new brush line. Each brush is so multi-functional and I didn't experience any shedding except for one tiny hair from the #1 powder brush. Overall, the quality of these brushes is great with the exception of the #26 and #14 brush, which do not work well with my sensitive eyes.

Note: The Chanel brushes can be purchased at Chanel's online store, Nordstrom, Macy's, Neiman Marcus, and any other department store that has a Chanel counter.

Is this post too long? 
I thought it would be "easier" to read 
if I combined my reviews of the Chanel brushes into one huge post. >_<

Will you be getting any of Chanel's new brushes?

3 comments:

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  2. Great reviews!! So fluffy and cute packaging :)

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  3. great review!!!

    ReplyDelete

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